LECTURE SERIES

Sherwood Anderson

 

Saturday, September 10 at 9:45 a.m.Dr. Jock Scott, Sherwood Anderson and the New Orleans YearsSmyth-Bland Regional Library.

Jock Scott was born in Alexandria, LA, where he still lives. He
received a bachelor's degree from Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, a
MA and PhD in History and JD in Law from Louisiana State University,
Baton Rouge, LA. Scott served in the Louisiana Legislature from
1976-1988, and has been teaching history courses, primarily American
History and Louisiana History, for LSU and LSU-Alexandria for a number
of years.

 

Thursday, September 22, 2005 at 7:00 p.m.—Halsey Bascom, The Sherwood Anderson and Wharton Esherick ConnectionSmyth-Bland Regional Library.

Halsey Bascom, the Director of Programs and Membership at the Wharton Esherick Museum in Paoli, PA is also Esherick’s granddaughter. She lived in the Esherick Farmhouse and had been a docent at the Museum before moving to Texas, where she was employed by the Former Texas Ranger Museum and Nation Museum of Western Art. She also initiated a line of custom designed women’s wear under the label “Ranch Dressing.” She has extensive experience in advertising, marketing, editing, fundraising and teaching. She has edited three newsletters and two national magazines and taught English reading and writing to 5th-7th graders. Halsey will speak about the connection and relationship between Sherwood Anderson and Wharton Esherick, who designed and carved Anderson’s gravestone.

 

 

Thursday, October 6, 7:30 p.m.— Dr. Katherine Foreman, Illustrated Lecture -“Ripshin, Rosemont and Restlessness: Sherwood Anderson’s Life in Southwest Virginia” — Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center, Abingdon, VA and Thursday, November 10, 7:00 p.m.,—Smyth-Bland Library, Marion, VA - Free

After being a wandering star in the literary and art worlds for almost a decade, Sherwood Anderson finally found himself at home at Ripshin (the house he built near Troutdale, VA) and at Rosemont in Marion, where lived the family of Eleanor Copenhaver, whom he would one day marry). From these locations, he corresponded extensively with far-flung compatriots until his intellectual restlessness drew him back into the public world. This presentation will combine rare photographs with passages from letters and diaries to create a lively portrait of Anderson’s life in the region from 1926 to 1941. A native of Marion, Katherine Foreman is a former member of the English faculty at Virginia Highlands Community College. Her graduate work at the University of Virginia included concentrations in women’s studies, and in American literature during Sherwood Anderson’s era of influence.

 

Thursday-, October 13, 7:00 p.m.—Dr. Margaret Ripley Wolfe, Eleanor Copenhaver AndersonSmyth-Bland Regional Library in Marion, Virginia.

Sherwood Anderson’s fourth and last wife, Eleanor Copenhaver Anderson, achieved distinction in her own right as a twentieth-century American social activist, according to Margaret Ripley Wolfe, Eleanor Anderson’s biographer. A native of Marion, Virginia, Eleanor began her career with the National Board of the Young Woman’s Christian Association in 1920 and retired in 1961. For approximately twenty-five years—longer than any other staff member, she remained deeply involved with the work of the Y’s Industrial Department, which operated out of New York City. In 1938, she became the Industrial Department’s national executive secretary. From its inception following World War I until its phase-out just after World War II, the Industrial Department functioned as the most radical and most controversial experiment ever to operate under the auspices of the YWCA. Margaret Ripley Wolfe earned her doctorate in American history at the University of Kentucky in 1974. She is currently Professor of History Emerita and Senior Faculty Affiliate at East Tennessee State University. Much of her research has focused on the South and Southern Appalachia, and her work has appeared in a range of scholarly outlets and professional publications. She has authored three books, contributed to more than fifteen others, and written numerous articles and essays. Wolfe’s best-known book is Daughters of Canaan: a Saga of Southern Women (University Press of Kentucky, 1995). Historian Carol Bleser, reviewing in the American Historical Review, called it “a tour de force… a stylish and authoritative synthesis of the prodigious research and writing being done in southern women’s history…a remarkable achievement worthy of a large general readership.”

 

Thursday, October 20, 7:30 p.m.—Doug Ogle, Illustrated Lecture - The ‘Nature’ of Sherwood AndersonSouthwest Virginia Higher Education Center, Abingdon, VA - Free

Often associated with large cities such as New York, New Orleans, and Chicago, Sherwood Anderson was clearly attracted to urban life. He was raised, however, in a rural environment in Ohio, where he formed close association with the horses and men that worked the land. He ultimately chose to build his residence and working area in a remote rural setting at the junction of Ripshin and Fox Creeks near Troutdale, Virginia. He worked on Tar: A Midwest Childhood while visiting Troutdale during 1926, and much of his subsequent work was done nearby. Though he also resided in the town of Marion and continued to travel widely, he was at home in the mountains. He found inspirations in plants, animals, and people. This talk will explore Anderson’s many connections with the natural world. Douglas Ogle spent summers within a stone’s throw of Ripshin Creek on a family farm. Long interested in Anderson and his natural connection, he is a retired biology professor from Virginia Highlands Community College and is currently working in rare plant restoration.

 

Sunday, October 23, 3:00 p.m.—Dr. John Lang, The Achievement of Winesbug, Ohio and Its Ongoing Literary LegacyWashington County Public Library, Abingdon, VA - Free

Winesburg, Ohio (1919), Sherwood Anderson’s greatest and best known book, continues to draw praise from literary critics and general readers alike for its lyrical language, its evocative imagery and symbolism, and its vivid characters. Experimental in form, with its loosely interrelated stories that provide the context for George Willard’s coming-of-age, Winesburg, Ohio has been seen as an example of realism, of naturalism, of ‘the revolt against the village,” of literary Freudianism, of lyrical fiction, and of many other movements and currents in 20th-century American literature. The lecture will explore the achievement of Anderson’s book and its ongoing literary legacy. A native of the Midwest, John Lang has taught American literature at Emory & Henry College since 1983. He is the author of Understanding Fred Chappell and editor of the college’s Iron Mountain Review.

 

Sunday, October 30, 3:00 p.m.—Hendrika Schuster, Living History - Eleanor Copenhaver AndersonWashington County Public Library, Abingdon, VA

When Sherwood Anderson moved to Southwest Virginia in 1925, many locals were suspicious of this Yankee wearing a white linen suit and white straw hat. Over the years, he ingratiated himself with the locals, eventually moving to Marion where he was especially befriended by the prominent Copenhaver family, whose daughter Eleanor had gone away to school to prepare herself for a career in social work. Anderson remarked that he fell in love first with the family home, “Rosemont,” as he was walking down the streets of Marion, then with Mrs. Laura Copenhaver, and finally with daughter Eleanor. In the 1930s, Eleanor was living in New York, involved in labor disputes and union activities with the national YWCA. An unconventional pair they were, but the fourth Mrs. Sherwood Anderson surprised everyone by having a very happy eight-year marriage with this famed author who was 21 years her senior. Henrika Schuster, originally from Chicago, had a career in teaching before moving to Abingdon more than 20 years ago. Inspired by the rich heritage of all of Virginia, she began role-playing regional women as a teaching tool for students. Now her one-woman performances are performed to festivals, civic clubs and schools throughout the area.

 

Thursday, November 16, 11:00 a.m..— Dr. Katherine Foreman, Illustrated Lecture -“Ripshin, Rosemont and Restlessness: Sherwood Anderson’s Life in Southwest Virginia” — Wytheville Community College, Wytheville, VA.

After being a wandering star in the literary and art worlds for almost a decade, Sherwood Anderson finally found himself at home at Ripshin (the house he built near Troutdale, VA) and at Rosemont in Marion, where lived the family of Eleanor Copenhaver, whom he would one day marry). From these locations, he corresponded extensively with far-flung compatriots until his intellectual restlessness drew him back into the public world. This presentation will combine rare photographs with passages from letters and diaries to create a lively portrait of Anderson’s life in the region from 1926 to 1941. A native of Marion, Katherine Foreman is a former member of the English faculty at Virginia Highlands Community College. Her graduate work at the University of Virginia included concentrations in women’s studies, and in American literature during Sherwood Anderson’s era of influence.